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Published: 22:08 GMT, 8 March 2022 | Updated: 11:21 GMT, 9 March 2022

Britain’s small businesses are today joining forces to boost the Mail Force appeal helping Ukrainian refugees.

An interior design entrepreneur, a jeweller, a yurts rental firm and a single mothers network are among the first to offer their support – and money.

Each has come up with an innovative way to donate to the cause, such as giving £1 per client or £10 per booking.

As well as swelling the appeal fund, the initiative shines a light on the nation’s small businesses after two years of hardship during the pandemic.

Children lying in a bomb shelter in the city of Mariupol. The conflict has so far displaced more than 1.5 million people, with refugees flooding west into the European Union

A girl sits in an improvised bomb shelter in Mariupol. Britain’s small businesses are doing their bit to contribute to the Daily Mail’s charity appeal to help those affected by the war in Ukraine

As more firms join in, donations will soon add up – with the scheme given the tag ‘small business, big difference’.

The idea is the brainchild of entrepreneur and TV presenter Alison Cork, who is donating £10 per order received by her online interiors business Alison At Home.

She said: ‘As a business owner myself, I knew our most resilient and resourceful community of entrepreneurs would rise to the challenge of donating to the Ukrainian people.’

Miss Cork, 58, who presents ITV’s Don’t Move, Improve and Channel 4’s Cowboy Builders, is also a business ambassador for the British Library.

She said: ‘By nature, entrepreneurs like me sit and twitch, and want to do something to help.

TV presenter Alison Cork (pictured) is donating £10 per order received by her online interiors business Alison At Home

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Ukraine war: The latest

  • Russia steps up its shelling as the UN says 1.5 million people have now fled
  • Attempts to evacuate civilians from Mariupol fail again, amid repeated ceasefire violations
  • Ukraine’s military says it is fighting ‘fierce battles’ on the edge of the southern city of Mykolayiv,
  • Dozens of civilians are being killed in the battle for Chernihiv in the north
  • A barrage of Russian missiles destroys Vinnytsia airport in central Ukraine
  • Russian shops are told to limit sales of essential foodstuffs to counter black market speculation
  • Thousands more are arrested at anti-war demonstrations in Russia, bringing the total to well over 11,000
  • Vladimir Putin says he will achieve his aims in Ukraine ‘through negotiation or through war’
  • US ‘green lights’ Poland to supply Kyiv with fighter jets, amid fears it could drag NATO into war
  • Antony Blinken says the West is in ‘very active’ discussions about a Russian oil embargo, despite price at all-time high
  • Credit card giants Visa, Mastercard and American Express freeze business in Russia. Russian banks say they will use China’s UnionPay system
  • Consultancy firms KPMG and PwC announce an end to operations in Russia
  • France announces it will send iodine tablets and other medical supplies to Ukraine. They are used to protect against the effects of exposure to radiation
  • krainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba says 20,000 international volunteers have joined the fight
  • Netflix suspends services in Russia and social media giant TikTok blocks posting of video content from the country
  • Foreign media including the BBC, CBC, ARD, ZDF, Bloomberg News, CNN, CBS, RAI and EFE have suspended reporting from Russia after Moscow threatened jail terms

‘This will encourage people to buy from their local businesses, and they in turn will support the Ukrainian refugees.

There are 5.6 million small businesses in the UK, who could make a very big difference with this campaign.’

The initiative is the latest boon for Mail Force, which became the fastest newspaper fundraising appeal of all time when it launched a week and a half ago.

Generous readers, companies and philanthropists have now given an incredible £4.5million.

This includes £500,000 donated by the Mail’s parent company DMGT at the request of Lord and Lady Rothermere.

The Mail Force charity, which does not use a single penny for admin, is distributing the money to good causes on the ground in Ukraine and neighbouring countries.

Jules Hawkins, who runs the Single Mums Business Network in Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire, is giving 10 per cent of her members’ fees for three months.

She said: ‘What’s going on in Ukraine is so heartbreaking. I’m a great believer in trying to do something. This won’t stop the war but it will make a small but tangible difference.’

Miss Hawkins, 45, who has a ten-year-old daughter, added: ‘We just want to do our bit for the children of Ukraine.’

Becca McClure decided to act after seeing the heartbreaking pictures of fleeing families with small children.

Her Leeds-based glamping and events hire business North Sky Yurts will donate £10 from each booking to the appeal.

Mrs McClure, 31, mum to two-year-old Kellan, said: ‘As the mum of a toddler, the thought of being uprooted, forced to run out of your house, your city is unimaginable.’

Anne Arkle, who runs Jaspersparkle Jewellers making rings from silver spoons in Anglesey, North Wales, struggled through the coronavirus lockdowns like small businesses everywhere.

She feels lucky to have got through the hard times, and now says it is time to help others.

Miss Arkle, 55, said: ‘After Covid, I know I am lucky to be safe and have shelter and so I thought I’d help and put aside £5 from each sale. It is only a little but it will add up.’

Last night humanitarian group Care International’s Helen Pankhurst – the great-granddaughter of suffragette Emmeline – told the Mail: ‘There are very many reasons why it is vital to support those fleeing war, and for women and girls there are extra reasons that are very difficult to think about.

‘Imagine the horror of giving birth in a bomb shelter while bombs go off. Or in a foreign country, on the run, with no family support.’

Here’s how YOU can help: Donate here to the Mail Force Ukraine Appeal

Readers of Mail Newspapers and MailOnline have always shown immense generosity at times of crisis.

Calling upon that human spirit, we are supporting a huge push to raise money for refugees from Ukraine.

For, surely, no one can fail to be moved by the heartbreaking images and stories of families – mostly women, children, the infirm and elderly – fleeing from the bombs and guns.

As this tally of misery increases over the coming days and months, these innocent victims of this conflict will require accommodation, schools and medical support.

Donations to the Mail Force Ukraine Appeal will be used to help charities and aid organisations providing such essential services.

In the name of charity and compassion, we urge all our readers to give swiftly and generously.

TO MAKE A DONATION ONLINE

To add Gift Aid to a donation – even one already made – complete an online form found here: mymail.co.uk/ukraine

Via bank transfer, please use these details:

Account name: Mail Force Charity

Account number: 48867365

Sort code: 60-00-01

TO MAKE A DONATION VIA CHEQUE

Make your cheque payable to ‘Mail Force’ and post it to: Mail Newspapers Ukraine Appeal, GFM, 42 Phoenix Court, Hawkins Road, Colchester, Essex CO2 8JY

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Published: 00:02 GMT, 14 March 2022 | Updated: 00:05 GMT, 14 March 2022

Heart-breaking images of stunned mothers and bewildered children bombed out of their homes have galvanised Daily Mail readers into action.

Scores have offered a haven in their homes to refugees fleeing the terror of warfare in Ukraine.

Such selflessness is being repeated up and down the country as Mail readers decide they can no longer simply sit back and watch the horrific conflict unfold without doing their bit.

Emails from people across the UK have flooded in, asking what they can do to help Ukrainians who are desperate to find somewhere safe to stay.

The Government is due to announce today the start of a scheme aiming to match fleeing Ukrainians with generous Britons who are willing to offer them a spare room.

Dominique Johnson, 48, said: ‘I have two spare rooms. The best way I could help personally would be to offer accommodation.’ The part-time carer added: ‘Ultimately, it could be us one day’

The Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday and MailOnline UKRAINE REFUGEE APPEAL

Readers of Mail Newspapers and MailOnline have always shown immense generosity at times of crisis.

Calling upon that human spirit, we are now launching an appeal to raise money for refugees from Ukraine.

For, surely, no one can fail to be moved by the heartbreaking images and stories of families – mostly women, children, the infirm and elderly – fleeing from Russia’s invading armed forces.

As this tally of misery increases over the coming days and months, these innocent victims of a tyrant will require accommodation, schools and medical support.

All donations to the Mail Ukraine Appeal will be distributed to charities and aid organisations providing such essential services.

In the name of charity and compassion, we urge all our readers to give swiftly and generously.

TO MAKE A DONATION ONLINE

To add Gift Aid to a donation – even one already made – complete an online form found here: mymail.co.uk/ukraine

Via bank transfer, please use these details:

Account name: Mail Force Charity

Account number: 48867365

Sort code: 60-00-01

TO MAKE A DONATION VIA CHEQUE

Make your cheque payable to ‘Mail Force’ and post it to: Mail Newspapers Ukraine Appeal, GFM, 42 Phoenix Court, Hawkins Road, Colchester, Essex CO2 8JY

TO MAKE A DONATION FROM THE US

US readers can donate to the appeal via a bank transfer to Associated Newspapers or by sending checks to dailymail.com HQ at 51 Astor Place (9th floor), New York, NY 10003

During the past fortnight, Ukrainian families have been forced to make tearful farewells as they are torn apart by war – with men aged between 18 and 60 made to stay behind to fight Russia’s invading army.

More than two million Ukrainians, including a million children, have escaped so far.

Here we highlight the stories of just a few of the Mail readers who are opening their homes and taking in displaced victims of the fighting:

Part-time carer

Dominique Johnson, 48, said: ‘I have two spare rooms. The best way I could help personally would be to offer accommodation.’

The part-time carer added: ‘Ultimately, it could be us one day.’

Miss Johnson, from Southend-on-Sea in Essex, said it did not matter whether anyone she takes in speaks English, adding: ‘You don’t have to know someone’s language to empathise with them. As long as we can communicate.’

Describing the war as unnecessary, she said: ‘There’s so much doom and gloom in the world that you tend to start feeling like there’s no good people.

‘But in times of crisis like this, you do see the good in people, and that’s heart-warming.

‘If I can help others, that’s all I’m doing this for.

‘Sharing your home is a risk for all involved. That’s why it’s good to ask the important questions before making the final decision.

‘Put yourself in their shoes – it is going to be uncomfortable for them as well as yourself.’

Miss Johnson added: ‘There’s people out there who are freezing cold, and I just put myself in their shoes because that’s all I can do right now.’

Retired BBC producer

Jenny Clement, 81, said her ‘peaceful’ bungalow with three bedrooms and a fenced-in garden in which children can play could provide the perfect refuge for those fleeing the conflict.

The retired BBC radio producer said: ‘I’m not under a flight path so for any children, who I would be happy to have, there would be no terror at the sound of aircraft.’

Mrs Clement, of Surbiton, Surrey, has four children and eight grandchildren.

She added: ‘How can you not rush to get these women and children to a place of safety? Everybody should get involved, especially when there are children who have had the most horrendous experience.

‘Children who have been so frightened and terrified and puzzled will feel safe here. I couldn’t wish for anything more than to help these poor people through what they are enduring. This is what anyone would want, to escape the bombing.’

Jenny Clement, 81, said her ‘peaceful’ bungalow with three bedrooms and a fenced-in garden in which children can play could provide the perfect refuge for those fleeing the conflict

Civil servant

Thoughts of the mass evacuation of children from British cities during the Second World War was enough to inspire retired civil servant Mark Smith, 68, and his wife Angela, 67.

The couple, from Shrewsbury, who have been married for 45 years, are offering the spare rooms in their cottage.

Mrs Smith, who worked as a psychiatric nurse, said: ‘We’ve been watching the news and thought, “What can we do?”

‘Money’s been sent off – but that’s not enough. We’ve got so much and other people have absolutely nothing.

‘We want to help in any way we can. You only have to look at the Second World War and the children that were evacuated. People could do it then in the 1940s, and people haven’t changed, we’re still the same and we all have the same needs.’

Former policeman

Retired police officer David McCrone, who lives in Knutsford, Cheshire, following a 35-year career in London, Thames Valley and Manchester, offered two rooms.

The 73-year-old said: ‘My children told me to go for it. My daughter pointed out that her husband’s father was sent to Siberia as a child. He was born in Poland but his family were sent to Siberia.’

Mr McCrone added: ‘His aunt, who is now 95, marched back from Siberia and eventually ended up in the United Kingdom at the end of the Second World War.’

He came forward before the Government announced it could pay £350 a month to those who take in Ukrainians. He said he was determined to stick it out for the long run, insisting: ‘You’ve got to realise it’s not just for a long weekend or even a holiday period – it’s a long-term commitment.’

Retired police officer David McCrone, who lives in Knutsford, Cheshire, following a 35-year career in London, Thames Valley and Manchester, offered two rooms

Foster carers

Lesley Bednarek, 67, whose father-in-law is Polish, has four empty bedrooms at her home in Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire.

She said: ‘It could so be us – my daughter, son or husband’s family in Poland. Why wouldn’t you help somebody who’s in trouble?’

She and her husband Anton, 71, worked as foster carers, but are now retired. She said they were used to children arriving at their home, adding: ‘My home is open. People need help now and want to be here tomorrow – not in two or three weeks.’

Pensioners

Terry Higgs, 76, and his wife Beryl Higgs-Light, 72, from Tavistock, Devon, have room for up to three people.

Mrs Higgs-Light, who worked as a nurse, said: ‘Where we live is a beautiful place in the country. It’s so peaceful it would be very restorative for people who have been through the trauma of the war.

‘It’s absolutely heart-breaking to see the news day after day.

‘We wanted to do something like welcoming refugees who have nowhere else to go and have lost their homes.’

She urged the Government to speed up the process of bringing refugees over, saying: ‘One thing we want to see is people being able to get here easily and not held up because of bureaucracy.’

Her husband, who worked as a contracts engineer, said he had experience of living in Russia that played a part in wanting to help, adding: ‘I was there when Yeltsin took over from Gorbachev. You could see how frightened the people were then and they must be the same now.’

Terry Higgs, 76, and his wife Beryl Higgs-Light, 72, from Tavistock, Devon, have room for up to three people

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