is cbd vape oil bad for you

Is Using A CBD Oil Vape Pen Safe?

You’ve probably seen some headlines that talk about vaping negatively. That’s why you’re here. You want to know if using CBD oil vape pens is safe. What most of the research is telling us is that it is. The issues that have come up with vaping usually have to do with low-quality products with ingredients that can be dangerous for your health.

CBD oil overall is considered to be safe. The World Health Organization released a report saying that CBD is ‘well-tolerated and safe for human consumption’ and that it’s not found to be addictive to humans.

We’re going to go over the safest way to vape CBD oil and some of the benefits of choosing to do it that way.

CBD Oil with Unsafe Ingredients

One of the main issues that the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) found as the primary cause of the health risks with vaping products was the use of vitamin E acetate. Vitamin E acetate is something that is used as an additive to dilute the oil used in vaping and on its own doesn’t usually cause harm. But the CDC found that when it’s heated up and inhaled, it can ‘interfere with normal lung functioning.’

Beyond vitamin E acetate, the addition of certain solvents in CBD vape oil has the potential to be dangerous as well. Some of the most popular ones are propylene glycol (PG), polyethene glycol (PEG) and vegetable glycerin (VG) that is used to thin the CBD vape oil.

The trouble with these comes when you heat propylene glycol and polyethene glycol between 243 o celcius and 248 o celcius. When propylene glycol is heated, it can create formaldehyde and other carcinogenic compounds. Polyethene glycol heated up also produces formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The amount of formaldehyde produced by heating it can be comparable to inhaling a cigarette. This can cause respiratory issues like asthma, and they have been linked to certain kinds of cancer. It was also found in a study to cause the death of cells in the brains of mice.

Amphora uses CBD distillate with added terpenes for our vape oil, which is organic. We don’t use any types of solvents or carrier oils in our products. With CBD distillate, you get the best elements of the whole cannabis plant and added terpenes, which have many wellness benefits on their own.

Certificate of Analysis is Crucial

If you want to make sure the CBD inhale product you’re using is safe, you need to find the certificate of analysis (COA). A COA tells you that you’re getting what the brand says is in their CBD oil, and it has been certified by a third-party.

These certificates should be readily available to you. Please don’t mess with brands that don’t have them. At Amphora, our certificates of analysis are easy to find on our website.

CBD Oil Is Non-Psychoactive

Another common concern about the safety of vaping CBD oil is that you might get ‘high’ off of it. This is one of the biggest misconceptions most people have about vaping CBD. Getting ‘high’ won’t happen with CBD oil. CBD is non-psychoactive, unlike its cannabinoid cousin THC. Cannabis is listed as a controlled drug in the Misuse of Drugs Act, but CBD is not. CBD oil is legal in the UK, but the THC content must be below 0.2% for the product to be compliant.

Pros of Vaping

CBD Bioavailability

Vaping is one of the fastest-acting options for taking CBD. That’s all thanks to its bioavailability. Bioavailability just means the degree and rate that CBD gets absorbed into your bloodstream. We want CBD to reach our bloodstream fast so it can start working with the endocannabinoid system that helps our body maintain balance or homeostasis.

Eating edibles or capsules would have a low bioavailability because it has to go through your digestive system and has to be broken down by your liver before it enters the bloodstream. The upside to this way of taking CBD though is that it will last longer. When you inhale, the vapour goes into your lungs and rapidly enters your bloodstream.

Convenient and Discrete

One of the best things about vaping is the ease of it. Vaporizers have been designed to be discrete and can be stored in a carrying case, purse or backpack. You can also easily order them online. With so many options out there, you can find the type of vaporizer that works best for you.

Other Ways to Take CBD

If vaping isn’t your thing, then there are still lots of ways you can take CBD.

CBD Edibles and Capsules

CBD can be mixed with a bunch of different foods, but the most common are sweets such as gummies or lollipops. They also can come in capsules that you can swallow. When you take CBD orally, it passes through the digestive tract and is eventually metabolized by the liver where the CBD is broken down even more. Because of this process, it takes longer to be released into your bloodstream so the effects can take anywhere from 30 to 180 minutes, but the results will last longer.

CBD Topicals

These types of products usually come in the form of creams, lotions or balms that are applied directly to the skin where you’re experiencing an issue. This isn’t bioavailability but rather more of a localized effect. How fast it takes depends on how well it penetrates your skin so it could be anywhere from 30 – 120 minutes. This way of taking it is usually used for people who suffer from pain or inflammation.

Sublingual Tincture

Sublingual Tincture is CBD oil that comes in a bottle and allows you to put a few drops under your tongue. It’s a popular way to take CBD. Even though you’re putting it in your mouth, it doesn’t have to go through your digestive system. There are glands under your tongue that will absorb the oil if you leave it there for about a minute. Meaning it goes into your bloodstream quicker and you’ll feel the results faster. The only downside is that it may not last as long as when you eat an edible or capsule.

Vaping can be a great way to enjoy all of the benefits of CBD, but it’s essential to do your research. Make sure you’re using a brand you trust, and that is transparent about the ingredients they’re using in their CBD vape oil products. Then you know you can vape without worry.

Written by | Infused Amphora Team

The Infused Amphora Team is dedicated to creating resources to educate and engage consumers on the growing evidence of CBD benefits and the extensive health and wellness properties of CBD Oil.

Contributor | Angus Taylor CEO

Infused Amphora “Learn” is intended for informational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

5 Vaping Facts You Need to Know

If you have thought about trying to kick a smoking habit, you’re not alone. Nearly 7 of 10 smokers say they want to stop. Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your health — smoking harms nearly every organ in your body, including your heart. Nearly one-third of deaths from heart disease are the result of smoking and secondhand smoke.

You might be tempted to turn to electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes, vape pens, and other nondisposable and disposable vaping devices) as a way to ease the transition from traditional cigarettes to not smoking at all. But is smoking e-cigarettes (also called vaping) better for you than using tobacco products? Can e-cigarettes help you to stop smoking once and for all? Michael Blaha, M.D., M.P.H., director of clinical research at the Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, shares health information about vaping.

1: Vaping is less harmful than smoking, but it’s still not safe.

E-cigarettes heat nicotine (extracted from tobacco), flavorings and other chemicals to create an aerosol that you inhale. Regular tobacco cigarettes contain 7,000 chemicals, many of which are toxic. While we don’t know exactly what chemicals are in e-cigarettes, Blaha says “There’s almost no doubt that vaping exposes you to fewer toxic chemicals than smoking traditional cigarettes.”

However, there has been an outbreak of lung injuries and deaths associated with vaping. In February 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed 2,807 cases of e-cigarette or vaping use-associated lung injury (EVALI) and 68 deaths attributed to that condition.

“These cases appear to predominantly affect people who modify their vaping devices or use black market modified e-liquids. This is especially true for vaping products containing THC,” explains Blaha.

The CDC has identified vitamin E acetate as a chemical of concern among people with EVALI. Vitamin E acetate is a thickening agent often used in THC vaping products, and it was found in all lung fluid samples of EVALI patients examined by the CDC.

The CDC recommends that people:

  • Do not use THC-containing e-cigarettes or vaping products.
  • Avoid using informal sources, such as friends, family or online dealers to obtain a vaping device.
  • Do not modify or add any substances to a vaping device that are not intended by the manufacturer.

Research from The Johns Hopkins University on vape ingredients published in October 2021 reveals thousands of chemical ingredients in vape products, most of which are not yet identified. Among those the team could identify were several potentially harmful substances, including caffeine, three chemicals never previously found in e-cigarettes, a pesticide and two flavorings linked with possible toxic effects and respiratory irritation.

2: Research suggests vaping is bad for your heart and lungs.

Nicotine is the primary agent in regular cigarettes and e-cigarettes, and it is highly addictive. It causes you to crave a smoke and suffer withdrawal symptoms if you ignore the craving. Nicotine is a toxic substance. It raises your blood pressure and spikes your adrenaline, which increases your heart rate and the likelihood of having a heart attack.

Is vaping bad for you? There are many unknowns about vaping, including what chemicals make up the vapor and how they affect physical health over the long term. “People need to understand that e-cigarettes are potentially dangerous to your health,” says Blaha. “Emerging data suggests links to chronic lung disease and asthma, as well as associations between dual use of e-cigarettes and smoking with cardiovascular disease. You’re exposing yourself to all kinds of chemicals that we don’t yet understand and that are probably not safe.”

3: Electronic cigarettes are just as addictive as traditional ones.

Both e-cigarettes and regular cigarettes contain nicotine, which research suggests may be as addictive as heroin and cocaine. What’s worse, says Blaha, many e-cigarette users get even more nicotine than they would from a combustible tobacco product: Users can buy extra-strength cartridges, which have a higher concentration of nicotine, or increase the e-cigarette’s voltage to get a greater hit of the substance.

Does Vaping Lead to Smoking?

Vaping and e-cigarettes are sometimes promoted as ways to help cigarette smokers quit. But what about the reverse? Can vaping lead to regular cigarette smoking later on?

4: Electronic cigarettes aren’t the best smoking cessation tool.

Although they’ve been promoted as an aid to help you quit smoking, e-cigarettes have not received Food and Drug Administration approval as smoking cessation devices. A recent study found that most people who intended to use e-cigarettes to kick the nicotine habit ended up continuing to use traditional and e-cigarettes.

In light of the EVALI outbreak, the CDC advises people who use e-cigarettes for smoking cessation to weigh the risks and benefits and first consider use of other FDA-approved smoking cessation options.

5: A new generation is getting hooked on nicotine.

Among youth, e-cigarettes, especially the disposable kind, are more popular than any traditional tobacco product. According to the 2021 National Youth Tobacco Survey, more than 2 million U.S. middle and high school students reported using e-cigarettes in 2021, with more than 8 in 10 of those youth using flavored e-cigarettes.

According to Blaha, there are three reasons e-cigarettes may be particularly enticing to young people. First, many teens believe vaping is less harmful than smoking. Second, e-cigarettes have a lower per-use cost than traditional cigarettes. Finally, youths and adults find the lack of smoke appealing. With no smell, e-cigarettes reduce some of the stigma of smoking.

“What I find most concerning about the rise of vaping is that people who would’ve never smoked otherwise, especially youth, are taking up the habit,” says Blaha. “It’s one thing if you convert from cigarette smoking to vaping. It’s quite another thing to start up nicotine use with vaping. And, getting hooked on nicotine often leads to using traditional tobacco products down the road.”

Research from the CDC shows that vaping among youth has declined somewhat since 2020. Kids being stuck at home under their parents’ supervision during the COVID-19 pandemic could contribute to that trend.

But, Blaha says, interpreting the data is tricky, since young people change their preferences often, and, when surveyed, may not consider using disposable products such as “puff bars” as vaping. The same CDC report says disposable e-cigarette use has increased 1,000% among high school students and 400% among middle school students since 2019.

Vaping and the COVID-19 Pandemic

When the coronavirus pandemic first began, Blaha says, data show that e-cigarette sales went down, possibly because people were spending more time at home and avoiding stores and public areas.

But Blaha sees a trend that concerns him: rising rates of daily e-cigarette use among all vape users. “The number of people who vaped daily used to be 1 in 5, but now it’s up quite a bit, which is concerning because it implies more nicotine addiction. I’m keeping a close eye on that.”

Want to quit smoking?

There’s a strong link between smoking and cardiovascular disease, and between smoking and cancer. But the sooner you quit, the quicker your body can rebound and repair itself. Talk to your doctor about which smoking cessation program or tools would be best for you.

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