is cbd oil legal in florida for minors

Is Delta-8 THC Legal in Florida?

Even with growing federal pressure, delta-8 isn’t going anywhere in The Sunshine State.

To all you Floridians out there, we have some great news. Delta-8 THC sourced from varieties of hemp is legal in Florida.

Under Florida state law, which falls in line with federal law as outlined in the 2018 Farm Bill, all hemp-derived cannabinoids, terpenes, flavonoids, and isomers are permitted for use, possession, sale, distribution, and production within the state.

In order for hemp-derived compounds to be legal on the state and federal level, hemp must only carry up to 0.3% delta-9 THC by dry weight. If the delta-9 percentage is above 0.3%, it’s classified as marijuana, which remains a federally controlled substance under Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

Is delta-8 legal in Florida?

  • Delta-8 derived from hemp carrying up to 0.3% THC is currently legal in Florida
  • You can use, possess, sell, distribute, and produce delta-8 and its products without fear of penalty or prosecution
  • You can legally purchase delta-8 products online
  • CBD and delta-10 THC are also legal in Florida
  • You can travel into Florida with delta-8 products in your possession

The legislative history of delta-8 in Florida

Following the federal enactment of the Farm Bill in 2018, Florida passed Senate Bill 1020, a piece of state legislation removing all hemp derivatives, cannabinoids, terpenes, flavonoids, and all other compounds from its comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act.

This means hemp-derived delta-8 THC is legal under state law, which coincides with federal law.

Is marijuana legal in Florida?

Recreational use of marijuana is strictly illegal in Florida. You are unable to use, possess, sell, distribute, or cultivate marijuana for recreational purposes. If caught, penalties are very strict. Possession of up to 20 grams is a misdemeanor and could see you in jail for one year with a fine of up to $1,000.

However, medical use of marijuana was legalized after the passing of Amendment 2 (Florida Medical Marijuana Legalization Initiative) in 2016 and Senate Bill 8A (Medical Use of Marijuana Act) later in 2017.

Buying delta-8 in Florida

Since hemp-derived delta-8 THC is legal in Florida, you’re able to purchase delta-8 products from licensed online vendors and in some retail stores.

There are several licensed retail shops located across Florida, not only in Miami but also in Crawfordville, Tallahassee, Clermont, and Clearwater Beach. Many of these dispensaries sell a variety of hemp delta-8 THC products, including delta-8 vape cartridges, gummies, and distillates, as well as a wide range of hemp-derived CBD products.

Hemp delta-8 products carry less than 0.3% THC and are legal to buy in Florida. Photo: Dan LaMorte/Oracle

If you’re nowhere near a dispensary or you want the convenience of having delta-8 products shipping to your address, there are hundreds of online vendors. You can find our comprehensive list of recommended delta-8 products here.

Recommended delta-8 products

1. 3Chi

3Chi is an award-winning delta-8 brand that carries one of the largest selections of products. They currently sell delta-8 vapes, concentrates, tinctures, gummies, baked edibles, and bulk options – all available for shipping to Florida.

2. Five

Five is one of the highest quality brands we’ve tested. Their delta-8 products are highly effective and potent. They currently offer delta-8 gummies and vapes, plus their new CBD+THC formulas that are as potent as delta-8 THC. They are based in California and offer shipping to Florida.

What type of delta-8 is legal in Florida?

Delta-8 sourced from federally legal, 2018 Farm Bill compliant varieties of hemp is completely legal in Florida. In order for hemp to be federally compliant, it should only contain 0.3% delta-9 by dry weight.

Under no circumstances can you purchase marijuana-derived delta-8 products nor can you buy high-THC marijuana with delta-8 THC in it. State law prohibits recreational marijuana and marijuana-derived compounds.

Marijuana-derived products with delta-8 are not legal in Florida. Marijuana-derived products are usually labeled as “cannabis infused” and are marked with the triangle symbol (THC warning). Photo: Morgan Lieberman/Oracle

Can you travel to Florida with delta-8?

Yes. You can travel to Florida with delta-8 THC products, provided the delta-8 is derived from federally compliant varieties of hemp carrying the legal 0.3% delta-9 limit. However, you should make sure you’re flying from a U.S. state where delta-8 is actually legal. You also have to make sure the airline allows delta-8 products as well.

If your delta-8 product is derived from high-THC varieties of marijuana, it’s illegal at the state and federal level, meaning you cannot travel into Florida with it in your possession.

After the 2018 Farm Bill was enacted, the TSA stopped actively screening for hemp-derived products carrying less than 0.3% delta-9 THC in luggage, no matter whether it’s checked-in or carry-on.

Before then, the TSA prohibited anyone from traveling with cannabis or cannabis-derived products (including hemp and marijuana) under federal law.

We recommend keeping all documentation of your delta-8 THC purchase with you before you fly. Receipts and third-party test results (Certificates of Analysis) are preferred here.

Is delta-10 THC legal in Florida?

Yes. Delta-10 THC is treated the exact same way as delta-8 THC in Florida on the state and federal levels. Why? Because delta-10 THC derived from hemp is federally protected by the 2018 Farm Bill, as are all other tetrahydrocannabinols aside from delta-9 THC.

Where can you purchase delta-10 THC products in FL?

You can purchase delta-10 THC products all across the state of Florida via licensed online and physical dispensaries, though stock might be limited since delta-10 is newer and less popular than delta-8.

Is CBD legal in Florida?

Yes. Hemp-derived cannabidiol (CBD) is perfectly legal to possess, use, sell, distribute, produce, cultivate in Florida, provided it’s sourced from legal varieties of hemp carrying no more than the legal 0.3% delta-9 THC by dry weight limit.

Upcoming legislation in Florida that could change delta-8’s legality?

There’s currently no upcoming state legislation that could change delta-8’s legality in Florida. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) made its stance on hemp-derived delta-8 very clear in a recent press statement, stating all hemp extracts and hemp derivatives are legal unless they carry or are sourced from hemp containing more than 0.3% delta-9 THC.

The future for delta-8 THC in Florida

Right now, delta-8 is legal in Florida but the federal government and its army of DEA fun-stoppers might change this

The DEA recently issued an Interim Final Rule in an attempt to clarify the definition of synthetic cannabinoids and how it applies to delta-8. It states all synthetically-derived tetrahydocannabinols must be federally regulated under Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act.

Since only 1% is present in hemp plants, delta-8 is known as a minor cannabinoid. This percentage certainly isn’t enough to viably create delta-8 products, so producers are forced to be a little bit more creative.

In order for producers to make enough delta-8 THC, a structural isomerization process converting CBD into delta-8 using chemicals takes place under laboratory conditions. Structural isomerization means taking one substance and converting it into another substance by making slight alterations to its molecular structure. In the eyes of the DEA, this process might meet the definition of “synthetically-derived”, which means it’s a synthetic cannabinoid, technically a controlled substance, and potentially illegal across the United States.

St. Pete hemp store owner wary of proposed legislative changes to Delta-8 THC

PINELLAS COUNTY, Fla. — Adam Wick began selling Delta-8 products at his Healthy Hemp Outlet store on Central Avenue in downtown St. Petersburg about nine months ago. He admits that he initially felt apprehensive about doing so since he’s been an advocate for the "non-feeling" variety of hemp which has helped him build up his business over the past four years.

“But as I saw the client pool coming in, the demographic wasn’t what I was sort of worried about,” he says. “It was adults that needed help to sleep, that had aches and pains.”

What You Need To Know
  • Delta-8 THC is legal in Florida, but state lawmakers intend to regulate it.
  • More than a dozen states have banned or restricted its use.
  • The FDA says Delta-8 THC has psychoactive and intoxicating effects.

But that part of his business could be in jeopardy based on legislation recently introduced in the Florida Legislature that aims to regulate Delta-8 products with the Department of Agriculture.

“One of the provisions of the bill that is a mandate is not to sell this to anyone under 21 years of age, so the end goal, if that’s what you’re asking, is to keep this product out of the hands of minors,” Fort Myers House Republican Spencer Roach told reporters at a press conference at the Capitol today.

Delta-8 is legal, as per the 2018 Farm Bill which distinguished hemp from marijuana and has become popular at stores like Healthy Hemp Outlet.

Hemp and marijuana come from the same species of plant, but hemp can’t contain more than 0.3 percent THC – the main psychoactive ingredient that provides the “high” when ingesting cannabis. But Delta-8 also has psychoactive and intoxicating effects, says the FDA. That’s prompted more than a dozen states this year to ban or restrict its use, eliminating the so-called “Delta-8 loophole” which comes from the Farm Bill.

One aim of that legislation was to distinguish between hemp, a non-intoxicating product, with marijuana, which is considered to be intoxicating, says Jonathan Miller, the general counsel for the U.S Hemp Roundtable.

“I have to admit I didn’t know and most members of Congress at the time had never heard of Delta-8 THC at that point,” says Miller, who was involved in helping draft the bill. “But since then, a lot of innovation has happened, and folks figured out that they were able to convert hemp-derived CBD into Delta-8 THC.”

Wick says that whether or not he’ll be able to legally sell Delta-8 in the future has clouded his plans regarding whether to expand his business. Rental prices in downtown St. Pete continue to rise, prompting him to consider moving further uptown.

"I hope that when they [the Legislature] look at this, they look at what’s happened already in the industry,” he says. “We’ve got almost a year [of selling this] and I don’t see any cause for alarm. I’m okay if they want to regulate it, much as the same as alcohol. I don’t think a teenager should be able to walk in here and acquire it or do it online either.”

Miller says that he doesn’t want to see Delta-8 banned but instead sold in dispensaries like medical marijuana currently is in Florida. “Let’s not market it as hemp. Let’s not sell it in grocery stores and vape shops where minors can purchase it unknowingly,” he says.

Along with the provisions regulating Delta-8, the bipartisan marijuana legislation (which in addition to Roach is co-sponsored by Hillsborough County Democrat Andrew Learned in the House and Sarasota Republican Joe Gruters and Broward County Democrat Shevrin Jones in the Senate) include these proposals:

Is cbd oil legal in florida for minors

The department must submit such documentation to the Consortium for Medical Marijuana Clinical Outcomes Research established pursuant to s. 1004.4351.

For the purposes of this paragraph, the term “seasonal resident” means any person who temporarily resides in this state for a period of at least 31 consecutive days in each calendar year, maintains a temporary residence in this state, returns to the state or jurisdiction of his or her residence at least one time during each calendar year, and is registered to vote or pays income tax in another state or jurisdiction.

Within 30 days after the receipt of a complete application, the department shall approve or deny the application.

A. Section 1, ch. 2017-232, provides that “[i]t is the intent of the Legislature to implement s. 29, Article X of the State Constitution by creating a unified regulatory structure. If s. 29, Article X of the State Constitution is amended or a constitutional amendment related to cannabis or marijuana is adopted, this act shall expire 6 months after the effective date of such amendment.” If such amendment or adoption takes place, s. 381.986, as amended by s. 1, ch. 2017-232, will read:

381.986 Compassionate use of low-THC and medical cannabis. —

(1) DEFINITIONS. — As used in this section, the term:

(a) “Cannabis delivery device” means an object used, intended for use, or designed for use in preparing, storing, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis into the human body.

(b) “Dispensing organization” means an organization approved by the department to cultivate, process, transport, and dispense low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis pursuant to this section.

(c) “Independent testing laboratory” means a laboratory, including the managers, employees, or contractors of the laboratory, which has no direct or indirect interest in a dispensing organization.

(d) “Legal representative” means the qualified patient’s parent, legal guardian acting pursuant to a court’s authorization as required under s. 744.3215(4), health care surrogate acting pursuant to the qualified patient’s written consent or a court’s authorization as required under s. 765.113, or an individual who is authorized under a power of attorney to make health care decisions on behalf of the qualified patient.

(e) “Low-THC cannabis” means a plant of the genus Cannabis , the dried flowers of which contain 0.8 percent or less of tetrahydrocannabinol and more than 10 percent of cannabidiol weight for weight; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; or any compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant or its seeds or resin that is dispensed only from a dispensing organization.

(f) “Medical cannabis” means all parts of any plant of the genus Cannabis , whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of the plant; and every compound, manufacture, sale, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant or its seeds or resin that is dispensed only from a dispensing organization for medical use by an eligible patient as defined in s. 499.0295.

(g) “Medical use” means administration of the ordered amount of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis. The term does not include the:

1. Possession, use, or administration of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis by smoking.

2. Transfer of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis to a person other than the qualified patient for whom it was ordered or the qualified patient’s legal representative on behalf of the qualified patient.

3. Use or administration of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis:

a. On any form of public transportation.

b. In any public place.

c. In a qualified patient’s place of employment, if restricted by his or her employer.

d. In a state correctional institution as defined in s. 944.02 or a correctional institution as defined in s. 944.241.

e. On the grounds of a preschool, primary school, or secondary school.

f. On a school bus or in a vehicle, aircraft, or motorboat.

(h) “Qualified patient” means a resident of this state who has been added to the compassionate use registry by a physician licensed under chapter 458 or chapter 459 to receive low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis from a dispensing organization.

(i) “Smoking” means burning or igniting a substance and inhaling the smoke. Smoking does not include the use of a vaporizer.

(2) PHYSICIAN ORDERING. — A physician is authorized to order low-THC cannabis to treat a qualified patient suffering from cancer or a physical medical condition that chronically produces symptoms of seizures or severe and persistent muscle spasms; order low-THC cannabis to alleviate symptoms of such disease, disorder, or condition, if no other satisfactory alternative treatment options exist for the qualified patient; order medical cannabis to treat an eligible patient as defined in s. 499.0295; or order a cannabis delivery device for the medical use of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis, only if the physician:

(a) Holds an active, unrestricted license as a physician under chapter 458 or an osteopathic physician under chapter 459;

(b) Has treated the patient for at least 3 months immediately preceding the patient’s registration in the compassionate use registry;

(c) Has successfully completed the course and examination required under paragraph (4)(a);

(d) Has determined that the risks of treating the patient with low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis are reasonable in light of the potential benefit to the patient. If a patient is younger than 18 years of age, a second physician must concur with this determination, and such determination must be documented in the patient’s medical record;

(e) Registers as the orderer of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis for the named patient on the compassionate use registry maintained by the department and updates the registry to reflect the contents of the order, including the amount of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis that will provide the patient with not more than a 45-day supply and a cannabis delivery device needed by the patient for the medical use of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis. The physician must also update the registry within 7 days after any change is made to the original order to reflect the change. The physician shall deactivate the registration of the patient and the patient’s legal representative when treatment is discontinued;

(f) Maintains a patient treatment plan that includes the dose, route of administration, planned duration, and monitoring of the patient’s symptoms and other indicators of tolerance or reaction to the low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis;

(g) Submits the patient treatment plan quarterly to the University of Florida College of Pharmacy for research on the safety and efficacy of low-THC cannabis and medical cannabis on patients;

(h) Obtains the voluntary written informed consent of the patient or the patient’s legal representative to treatment with low-THC cannabis after sufficiently explaining the current state of knowledge in the medical community of the effectiveness of treatment of the patient’s condition with low-THC cannabis, the medically acceptable alternatives, and the potential risks and side effects;

(i) Obtains written informed consent as defined in and required under s. 499.0295, if the physician is ordering medical cannabis for an eligible patient pursuant to that section; and

(j) Is not a medical director employed by a dispensing organization.

(a) A physician commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083, if the physician orders low-THC cannabis for a patient without a reasonable belief that the patient is suffering from:

1. Cancer or a physical medical condition that chronically produces symptoms of seizures or severe and persistent muscle spasms that can be treated with low-THC cannabis; or

2. Symptoms of cancer or a physical medical condition that chronically produces symptoms of seizures or severe and persistent muscle spasms that can be alleviated with low-THC cannabis.

(b) A physician commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083, if the physician orders medical cannabis for a patient without a reasonable belief that the patient has a terminal condition as defined in s. 499.0295.

(c) A person who fraudulently represents that he or she has cancer, a physical medical condition that chronically produces symptoms of seizures or severe and persistent muscle spasms, or a terminal condition to a physician for the purpose of being ordered low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device by such physician commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.

(d) An eligible patient as defined in s. 499.0295 who uses medical cannabis, and such patient’s legal representative who administers medical cannabis, in plain view of or in a place open to the general public, on the grounds of a school, or in a school bus, vehicle, aircraft, or motorboat, commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.

(e) A physician who orders low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device and receives compensation from a dispensing organization related to the ordering of low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device is subject to disciplinary action under the applicable practice act and s. 456.072(1)(n).

(a) Before ordering low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device for medical use by a patient in this state, the appropriate board shall require the ordering physician to successfully complete an 8-hour course and subsequent examination offered by the Florida Medical Association or the Florida Osteopathic Medical Association that encompasses the clinical indications for the appropriate use of low-THC cannabis and medical cannabis, the appropriate cannabis delivery devices, the contraindications for such use, and the relevant state and federal laws governing the ordering, dispensing, and possessing of these substances and devices. The course and examination shall be administered at least annually. Successful completion of the course may be used by a physician to satisfy 8 hours of the continuing medical education requirements required by his or her respective board for licensure renewal. This course may be offered in a distance learning format.

(b) The appropriate board shall require the medical director of each dispensing organization to hold an active, unrestricted license as a physician under chapter 458 or as an osteopathic physician under chapter 459 and successfully complete a 2-hour course and subsequent examination offered by the Florida Medical Association or the Florida Osteopathic Medical Association that encompasses appropriate safety procedures and knowledge of low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, and cannabis delivery devices.

(c) Successful completion of the course and examination specified in paragraph (a) is required for every physician who orders low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device each time such physician renews his or her license. In addition, successful completion of the course and examination specified in paragraph (b) is required for the medical director of each dispensing organization each time such physician renews his or her license.

(d) A physician who fails to comply with this subsection and who orders low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device may be subject to disciplinary action under the applicable practice act and under s. 456.072(1)(k).

(5) DUTIES OF THE DEPARTMENT. — The department shall:

(a) Create and maintain a secure, electronic, and online compassionate use registry for the registration of physicians, patients, and the legal representatives of patients as provided under this section. The registry must be accessible to law enforcement agencies and to a dispensing organization to verify the authorization of a patient or a patient’s legal representative to possess low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device and record the low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or cannabis delivery device dispensed. The registry must prevent an active registration of a patient by multiple physicians.

(b) Authorize the establishment of five dispensing organizations to ensure reasonable statewide accessibility and availability as necessary for patients registered in the compassionate use registry and who are ordered low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device under this section, one in each of the following regions: northwest Florida, northeast Florida, central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida. The department shall develop an application form and impose an initial application and biennial renewal fee that is sufficient to cover the costs of administering this section. An applicant for approval as a dispensing organization must be able to demonstrate:

1. The technical and technological ability to cultivate and produce low-THC cannabis. The applicant must possess a valid certificate of registration issued by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services pursuant to s. 581.131 that is issued for the cultivation of more than 400,000 plants, be operated by a nurseryman as defined in s. 581.011, and have been operated as a registered nursery in this state for at least 30 continuous years.

2. The ability to secure the premises, resources, and personnel necessary to operate as a dispensing organization.

3. The ability to maintain accountability of all raw materials, finished products, and any byproducts to prevent diversion or unlawful access to or possession of these substances.

4. An infrastructure reasonably located to dispense low-THC cannabis to registered patients statewide or regionally as determined by the department.

5. The financial ability to maintain operations for the duration of the 2-year approval cycle, including the provision of certified financials to the department. Upon approval, the applicant must post a $5 million performance bond. However, upon a dispensing organization’s serving at least 1,000 qualified patients, the dispensing organization is only required to maintain a $2 million performance bond.

6. That all owners and managers have been fingerprinted and have successfully passed a level 2 background screening pursuant to s. 435.04.

7. The employment of a medical director to supervise the activities of the dispensing organization.

(c) Upon the registration of 250,000 active qualified patients in the compassionate use registry, approve three dispensing organizations, including, but not limited to, an applicant that is a recognized class member of Pigford v. Glickman , 185 F.R.D. 82 (D.D.C. 1999), or In Re Black Farmers Litig. , 856 F. Supp. 2d 1 (D.D.C. 2011), and a member of the Black Farmers and Agriculturalists Association, which must meet the requirements of subparagraphs (b)2.-7. and demonstrate the technical and technological ability to cultivate and produce low-THC cannabis.

(d) Allow a dispensing organization to make a wholesale purchase of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis from, or a distribution of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis to, another dispensing organization.

(e) Monitor physician registration and ordering of low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device for ordering practices that could facilitate unlawful diversion or misuse of low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device and take disciplinary action as indicated.

(6) DISPENSING ORGANIZATION. — An approved dispensing organization must, at all times, maintain compliance with the criteria demonstrated for selection and approval as a dispensing organization under subsection (5) and the criteria required in this subsection.

(a) When growing low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis, a dispensing organization:

1. May use pesticides determined by the department, after consultation with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, to be safely applied to plants intended for human consumption, but may not use pesticides designated as restricted-use pesticides pursuant to s. 487.042.

2. Must grow low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis within an enclosed structure and in a room separate from any other plant.

3. Must inspect seeds and growing plants for plant pests that endanger or threaten the horticultural and agricultural interests of the state, notify the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services within 10 calendar days after a determination that a plant is infested or infected by such plant pest, and implement and maintain phytosanitary policies and procedures.

4. Must perform fumigation or treatment of plants, or the removal and destruction of infested or infected plants, in accordance with chapter 581 and any rules adopted thereunder.

(b) When processing low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis, a dispensing organization must:

1. Process the low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis within an enclosed structure and in a room separate from other plants or products.

2. Test the processed low-THC cannabis and medical cannabis before they are dispensed. Results must be verified and signed by two dispensing organization employees. Before dispensing low-THC cannabis, the dispensing organization must determine that the test results indicate that the low-THC cannabis meets the definition of low-THC cannabis and, for medical cannabis and low-THC cannabis, that all medical cannabis and low-THC cannabis is safe for human consumption and free from contaminants that are unsafe for human consumption. The dispensing organization must retain records of all testing and samples of each homogenous batch of cannabis and low-THC cannabis for at least 9 months. The dispensing organization must contract with an independent testing laboratory to perform audits on the dispensing organization’s standard operating procedures, testing records, and samples and provide the results to the department to confirm that the low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis meets the requirements of this section and that the medical cannabis and low-THC cannabis is safe for human consumption.

3. Package the low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis in compliance with the United States Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970, 15 U.S.C. ss. 1471 et seq.

4. Package the low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis in a receptacle that has a firmly affixed and legible label stating the following information:

a. A statement that the low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis meets the requirements of subparagraph 2.;

b. The name of the dispensing organization from which the medical cannabis or low-THC cannabis originates; and

c. The batch number and harvest number from which the medical cannabis or low-THC cannabis originates.

5. Reserve two processed samples from each batch and retain such samples for at least 9 months for the purpose of testing pursuant to the audit required under subparagraph 2.

(c) When dispensing low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device, a dispensing organization:

1. May not dispense more than a 45-day supply of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis to a patient or the patient’s legal representative.

2. Must have the dispensing organization’s employee who dispenses the low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device enter into the compassionate use registry his or her name or unique employee identifier.

3. Must verify in the compassionate use registry that a physician has ordered the low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a specific type of a cannabis delivery device for the patient.

4. May not dispense or sell any other type of cannabis, alcohol, or illicit drug-related product, including pipes, bongs, or wrapping papers, other than a physician-ordered cannabis delivery device required for the medical use of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis, while dispensing low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis.

5. Must verify that the patient has an active registration in the compassionate use registry, the patient or patient’s legal representative holds a valid and active registration card, the order presented matches the order contents as recorded in the registry, and the order has not already been filled.

6. Must, upon dispensing the low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or cannabis delivery device, record in the registry the date, time, quantity, and form of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis dispensed and the type of cannabis delivery device dispensed.

(d) To ensure the safety and security of its premises and any off-site storage facilities, and to maintain adequate controls against the diversion, theft, and loss of low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or cannabis delivery devices, a dispensing organization shall:

1.a. Maintain a fully operational security alarm system that secures all entry points and perimeter windows and is equipped with motion detectors; pressure switches; and duress, panic, and hold-up alarms; or

b. Maintain a video surveillance system that records continuously 24 hours each day and meets at least one of the following criteria:

(I) Cameras are fixed in a place that allows for the clear identification of persons and activities in controlled areas of the premises. Controlled areas include grow rooms, processing rooms, storage rooms, disposal rooms or areas, and point-of-sale rooms;

(II) Cameras are fixed in entrances and exits to the premises, which shall record from both indoor and outdoor, or ingress and egress, vantage points;

(III) Recorded images must clearly and accurately display the time and date; or

(IV) Retain video surveillance recordings for a minimum of 45 days or longer upon the request of a law enforcement agency.

2. Ensure that the organization’s outdoor premises have sufficient lighting from dusk until dawn.

3. Establish and maintain a tracking system approved by the department that traces the low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis from seed to sale. The tracking system shall include notification of key events as determined by the department, including when cannabis seeds are planted, when cannabis plants are harvested and destroyed, and when low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis is transported, sold, stolen, diverted, or lost.

4. Not dispense from its premises low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device between the hours of 9 p.m. and 7 a.m., but may perform all other operations and deliver low-THC cannabis and medical cannabis to qualified patients 24 hours each day.

5. Store low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis in a secured, locked room or a vault.

6. Require at least two of its employees, or two employees of a security agency with whom it contracts, to be on the premises at all times.

7. Require each employee to wear a photo identification badge at all times while on the premises.

8. Require each visitor to wear a visitor’s pass at all times while on the premises.

9. Implement an alcohol and drug-free workplace policy.

10. Report to local law enforcement within 24 hours after it is notified or becomes aware of the theft, diversion, or loss of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis.

(e) To ensure the safe transport of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis to dispensing organization facilities, independent testing laboratories, or patients, the dispensing organization must:

1. Maintain a transportation manifest, which must be retained for at least 1 year.

2. Ensure only vehicles in good working order are used to transport low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis.

3. Lock low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis in a separate compartment or container within the vehicle.

4. Require at least two persons to be in a vehicle transporting low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis, and require at least one person to remain in the vehicle while the low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis is being delivered.

5. Provide specific safety and security training to employees transporting or delivering low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis.

(7) DEPARTMENT AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITIES. —

(a) The department may conduct announced or unannounced inspections of dispensing organizations to determine compliance with this section or rules adopted pursuant to this section.

(b) The department shall inspect a dispensing organization upon complaint or notice provided to the department that the dispensing organization has dispensed low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis containing any mold, bacteria, or other contaminant that may cause or has caused an adverse effect to human health or the environment.

(c) The department shall conduct at least a biennial inspection of each dispensing organization to evaluate the dispensing organization’s records, personnel, equipment, processes, security measures, sanitation practices, and quality assurance practices.

(d) The department may enter into interagency agreements with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, the Department of Transportation, the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, and the Agency for Health Care Administration, and such agencies are authorized to enter into an interagency agreement with the department, to conduct inspections or perform other responsibilities assigned to the department under this section.

(e) The department must make a list of all approved dispensing organizations and qualified ordering physicians and medical directors publicly available on its website.

(f) The department may establish a system for issuing and renewing registration cards for patients and their legal representatives, establish the circumstances under which the cards may be revoked by or must be returned to the department, and establish fees to implement such system. The department must require, at a minimum, the registration cards to:

1. Provide the name, address, and date of birth of the patient or legal representative.

2. Have a full-face, passport-type, color photograph of the patient or legal representative taken within the 90 days immediately preceding registration.

3. Identify whether the cardholder is a patient or legal representative.

4. List a unique numeric identifier for the patient or legal representative that is matched to the identifier used for such person in the department’s compassionate use registry.

5. Provide the expiration date, which shall be 1 year after the date of the physician’s initial order of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis.

6. For the legal representative, provide the name and unique numeric identifier of the patient that the legal representative is assisting.

7. Be resistant to counterfeiting or tampering.

(g) The department may impose reasonable fines not to exceed $10,000 on a dispensing organization for any of the following violations:

1. Violating this section, s. 499.0295, or department rule.

2. Failing to maintain qualifications for approval.

3. Endangering the health, safety, or security of a qualified patient.

4. Improperly disclosing personal and confidential information of the qualified patient.

5. Attempting to procure dispensing organization approval by bribery, fraudulent misrepresentation, or extortion.

6. Being convicted or found guilty of, or entering a plea of guilty or nolo contendere to, regardless of adjudication, a crime in any jurisdiction which directly relates to the business of a dispensing organization.

7. Making or filing a report or record that the dispensing organization knows to be false.

8. Willfully failing to maintain a record required by this section or department rule.

9. Willfully impeding or obstructing an employee or agent of the department in the furtherance of his or her official duties.

10. Engaging in fraud or deceit, negligence, incompetence, or misconduct in the business practices of a dispensing organization.

11. Making misleading, deceptive, or fraudulent representations in or related to the business practices of a dispensing organization.

12. Having a license or the authority to engage in any regulated profession, occupation, or business that is related to the business practices of a dispensing organization suspended, revoked, or otherwise acted against by the licensing authority of any jurisdiction, including its agencies or subdivisions, for a violation that would constitute a violation under Florida law.

13. Violating a lawful order of the department or an agency of the state, or failing to comply with a lawfully issued subpoena of the department or an agency of the state.

(h) The department may suspend, revoke, or refuse to renew a dispensing organization’s approval if a dispensing organization commits any of the violations in paragraph (g).

(i) The department shall renew the approval of a dispensing organization biennially if the dispensing organization meets the requirements of this section and pays the biennial renewal fee.

(j) The department may adopt rules necessary to implement this section.

(a) All matters regarding the regulation of the cultivation and processing of medical cannabis or low-THC cannabis by dispensing organizations are preempted to the state.

(b) A municipality may determine by ordinance the criteria for the number and location of, and other permitting requirements that do not conflict with state law or department rule for, dispensing facilities of dispensing organizations located within its municipal boundaries. A county may determine by ordinance the criteria for the number, location, and other permitting requirements that do not conflict with state law or department rule for all dispensing facilities of dispensing organizations located within the unincorporated areas of that county.

(9) EXCEPTIONS TO OTHER LAWS. —

(a) Notwithstanding s. 893.13, s. 893.135, s. 893.147, or any other provision of law, but subject to the requirements of this section, a qualified patient and the qualified patient’s legal representative may purchase and possess for the patient’s medical use up to the amount of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis ordered for the patient, but not more than a 45-day supply, and a cannabis delivery device ordered for the patient.

(b) Notwithstanding s. 893.13, s. 893.135, s. 893.147, or any other provision of law, but subject to the requirements of this section, an approved dispensing organization and its owners, managers, and employees may manufacture, possess, sell, deliver, distribute, dispense, and lawfully dispose of reasonable quantities, as established by department rule, of low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device. For purposes of this subsection, the terms “manufacture,” “possession,” “deliver,” “distribute,” and “dispense” have the same meanings as provided in s. 893.02.

(c) Notwithstanding s. 893.13, s. 893.135, s. 893.147, or any other provision of law, but subject to the requirements of this section, an approved independent testing laboratory may possess, test, transport, and lawfully dispose of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis as provided by department rule.

(d) An approved dispensing organization and its owners, managers, and employees are not subject to licensure or regulation under chapter 465 or chapter 499 for manufacturing, possessing, selling, delivering, distributing, dispensing, or lawfully disposing of reasonable quantities, as established by department rule, of low-THC cannabis, medical cannabis, or a cannabis delivery device.

(e) An approved dispensing organization that continues to meet the requirements for approval is presumed to be registered with the department and to meet the regulations adopted by the department or its successor agency for the purpose of dispensing medical cannabis or low-THC cannabis under Florida law. Additionally, the authority provided to a dispensing organization in s. 499.0295 does not impair the approval of a dispensing organization.

(f) This subsection does not exempt a person from prosecution for a criminal offense related to impairment or intoxication resulting from the medical use of low-THC cannabis or medical cannabis or relieve a person from any requirement under law to submit to a breath, blood, urine, or other test to detect the presence of a controlled substance.

B. Section 14(1), ch. 2017-232, as amended by s. 15, ch. 2021-37, “in order to implement Specific Appropriations 460 through 462, 466, 467, 469A, and 474 of the 2021-2022 General Appropriations Act,” provides that:

“(a) The Department of Health and the applicable boards shall adopt emergency rules pursuant to s. 120.54(4), Florida Statutes, and this section necessary to implement ss. 381.986 and 381.988, Florida Statutes. If an emergency rule adopted under this section is held to be unconstitutional or an invalid exercise of delegated legislative authority, and becomes void, the department or the applicable boards may adopt an emergency rule pursuant to this section to replace the rule that has become void. If the emergency rule adopted to replace the void emergency rule is also held to be unconstitutional or an invalid exercise of delegated legislative authority and becomes void, the department and the applicable boards must follow the nonemergency rulemaking procedures of the Administrative Procedures Act to replace the rule that has become void.

“(b) For emergency rules adopted under this section, the department and the applicable boards need not make the findings required by s. 120.54(4)(a), Florida Statutes. Emergency rules adopted under this section are exempt from ss. 120.54(3)(b) and 120.541, Florida Statutes. The department and the applicable boards shall meet the procedural requirements in s. 120.54(4)(a), Florida Statutes, if the department or the applicable boards have, before July 1, 2019, held any public workshops or hearings on the subject matter of the emergency rules adopted under this subsection. Challenges to emergency rules adopted under this subsection are subject to the time schedules provided in s. 120.56(5), Florida Statutes.

“(c) Emergency rules adopted under this section are exempt from s. 120.54(4)(c), Florida Statutes, and shall remain in effect until replaced by rules adopted under the nonemergency rulemaking procedures of the Administrative Procedures Act. Rules adopted under the nonemergency rulemaking procedures of the Administrative Procedures Act to replace emergency rules adopted under this section are exempt from ss. 120.54(3)(b) and 120.541, Florida Statutes. By July 1, 2022, the department and the applicable boards shall initiate nonemergency rulemaking pursuant to the Administrative Procedures Act to replace all emergency rules adopted under this section by publishing a notice of rule development in the Florida Administrative Register. Except as provided in paragraph (a), after July 1, 2022, the department and applicable boards may not adopt rules pursuant to the emergency rulemaking procedures provided in this section.”

C. Section 16, ch. 2021-37, provides that “[t]he amendments to s. 14(1) of chapter 2017-232, Laws of Florida, made by this act expire July 1, 2022, and the text of that subsection shall revert to that in existence on June 30, 2019, except that any amendments to such text enacted other than by this act shall be preserved and continue to operate to the extent that such amendments are not dependent upon the portions of text which expire pursuant to this section.” Effective July 1, 2022, s. 14(1), ch. 2017-232, as amended by s. 16, ch. 2021-37, will read:

“(a) The Department of Health and the applicable boards shall adopt emergency rules pursuant to s. 120.54(4), Florida Statutes, and this section necessary to implement ss. 381.986 and 381.988, Florida Statutes. If an emergency rule adopted under this section is held to be unconstitutional or an invalid exercise of delegated legislative authority, and becomes void, the department or the applicable boards may adopt an emergency rule pursuant to this section to replace the rule that has become void. If the emergency rule adopted to replace the void emergency rule is also held to be unconstitutional or an invalid exercise of delegated legislative authority and becomes void, the department and the applicable boards must follow the nonemergency rulemaking procedures of the Administrative Procedures Act to replace the rule that has become void.

“(b) For emergency rules adopted under this section, the department and the applicable boards need not make the findings required by s. 120.54(4)(a), Florida Statutes. Emergency rules adopted under this section are exempt from ss. 120.54(3)(b) and 120.541, Florida Statutes. The department and the applicable boards shall meet the procedural requirements in s. 120.54(a), Florida Statutes, if the department or the applicable boards have, before [June 23, 2017], held any public workshops or hearings on the subject matter of the emergency rules adopted under this subsection. Challenges to emergency rules adopted under this subsection are subject to the time schedules provided in s. 120.56(5), Florida Statutes.

“(c) Emergency rules adopted under this section are exempt from s. 120.54(4)(c), Florida Statutes, and shall remain in effect until replaced by rules adopted under the nonemergency rulemaking procedures of the Administrative Procedures Act. By January 1, 2018, the department and the applicable boards shall initiate nonemergency rulemaking pursuant to the Administrative Procedures Act to replace all emergency rules adopted under this section by publishing a notice of rule development in the Florida Administrative Register. Except as provided in paragraph (a), after January 1, 2018, the department and applicable boards may not adopt rules pursuant to the emergency rulemaking procedures provided in this section.”